Press Releases

Showing: October, 2021

Sen. Micheal Bergstrom, R-Adair, filed Senate Concurrent Resolution 13 Thursday, urging Congress to protect consumers from harmful Internal Revenue Service (IRS) rules, such as burdensome reporting requirements for financial institutions.

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Since 1990, presidents have approved congressional resolutions to honor this country’s Native American heritage during November.  Sen. Kay Floyd, Democratic Leader for the Oklahoma Senate, hopes citizens throughout the state will join in the national observance throughout the month.

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Foreign animal diseases are a constant threat to Oklahoma’s livestock. An outbreak of African Swine Fever (ASF) on American soil would have devastating consequences for agriculture producers and our state’s economy.  That’s according to Sen. Casey Murdock, R-Felt, who expressed his complete support for any measures taken to curb foreign animal diseases, like ASF, from entering the country.

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OKLAHOMA CITY – Oklahoma Senate President Pro Tempore Greg Treat on Wednesday announced changes to Senate leadership and some committee chair assignments.

Treat said Sen. Greg McCortney, R-Ada, will take over the duties of majority floor leader from Sen. Kim David, R-Porter. Treat said David will continue her Senate service and she will remain a trusted voice and leader for Senate Republicans.

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The leader of the Oklahoma Senate announced Monday his appointments to the Joint Committee on State-Tribal Relations. The committee is responsible for overseeing and approving agreements between tribal governments and the state and consists of five members appointed by the speaker of the House and five members appointed by the president pro tempore of the Senate.

President Pro Tempore Greg Treat, R-Oklahoma City, appointed the following senators to the committee:

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Sen. George Young, D-Oklahoma City, hosted an interim study Wednesday, Oct. 20, that took an in depth look at equality issues related to racial discrimination and bias in state agencies, communities, organizations, and businesses across Oklahoma. The study was held in the Senate Appropriations Committee.

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OKLAHOMA CITY – State Sen. David Bullard, R-Durant, released the following statement supporting House Bill 1775, which prevents schools from teaching certain theories, such as one race or sex is superior to the other, after the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) filed suit to block the measure in Oklahoma.

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Sen. Cody Rogers, R-Tulsa, and Sen. Roland Pederson, R-Burlington, will study process validation and medical marijuana testing requirements in the Senate Health and Human Services Committee on Monday, Oct. 25 at 10:30 a.m. in room 535 of the state Capitol.

The study will include an overview of Oklahoma’s medical marijuana industry as well as process validation, which allows marijuana manufacturers, growers and producers to assure quality and provide consumers with a safe and reliable product.

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OKLAHOMA CITY - Oklahoma Senate President Pro Tempore Greg Treat, R-Oklahoma City, issued the following statement Thursday in response to a Oklahoma State Department of Health court settlement on birth certificates:

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State Sen. Blake Stephens, R-Tahlequah, hosted an interim study Tuesday looking at the benefits of “locking the clock” and making Daylight Saving Time (DST) the official time in Oklahoma year-round.

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Sen. Micheal Bergstrom, R-Adair, filed SB 1100 on Wednesday, which would require male and female to be the only options on birth certificates to identify a child’s sex at birth.

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OKLAHOMA CITY – Oklahoma Senate Republicans support the effort to challenge the president’s overreaching vaccine mandate, said Senate President Pro Tempore Greg Treat, R-Oklahoma City.

Treat said Senate Republicans this year backed legislation and funding for a special unit in the Attorney General’s office to challenge and overturn federal overreach – like the president’s vaccine mandate.

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Sen. Blake Stephens, R-Tahlequah, will present an interim study analyzing the benefits of “locking the clock” and establishing Daylight Saving Time (DST) as the official time year-round in Oklahoma. The study will be held by the Senate General Government Committee on Tuesday, Oct. 19 at 9 a.m. in room 230 of the state Capitol.

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OKLAHOMA CITY – On Wednesday, the Senate Education Committee learned what accommodations are provided to pregnant students and young families in Oklahoma’s high schools, colleges and CareerTech system. The study was requested by Sen. Mary Boren, D-Norman, who wants to ensure young mothers and fathers are given every opportunity to finish their education and see how the Legislature may be able to further help these young parents achieve their education goals.

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Senators Chuck Hall, R-Perry, and Julia Kirt, D-Oklahoma City, hosted an interim study Wednesday looking into film and media arts programs for kindergarten through 12th grade students. The study connected primary and secondary school opportunities with the rapidly expanding opportunities in Oklahoma’s film and production industry.

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In the midst of a historic teacher shortage, further crippled by the COVID-19 pandemic, Sen. Jo Anna Dossett, D-Tulsa, hosted an interim study Tuesday looking into prioritizing teacher certification scholarships for English as a second language (ESL) and special education teachers.

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The Senate Public Safety Committee on Wednesday heard testimony from the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation (OSBI) and Office of the Attorney General in an interim study hosted by Senate Democratic Leader Kay Floyd, D-Oklahoma City, regarding the state’s response to the sexual assault kits backlog.

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The Senate Public Safety Committee heard from breastfeeding advocates, experts and philanthropists Tuesday regarding the benefits of breastfeeding and programs other states have implemented to increase health outcomes for incarcerated women and their babies.

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Sen. Julia Kirt will lead an interim study to examine the resources needed for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities transitioning from public schools to further education, employment and independent living.

The Oklahoma City Democrat said the study will analyze the benefits and potential drawbacks of people with developmental or intellectual disabilities staying in school longer as well as the pros and cons of utilizing federal funds available for disabled students.

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Senate Majority Caucus Chair Dave Rader, R-Tulsa, will host an interim study regarding criminal sentencing reform today, Tuesday, Oct. 5, at 1 p.m. in the Senate Public Safety Committee.

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